'Every Experience Makes Me Want to Be A Doctor More.'

Jackelin is a 23-year-old medical student.
September 7, 2018 - Bolivia

Jackelin at her university UCEBOL. “At this university I will get the best education for becoming a good doctor.”
1/5

Jackelin is in her fourth year of studies. “I am happy that I have passed the two first years, which were mainly theory. The last year of studying was way more interesting.” It’s something she has always known. Her favorite part of the medical field: Having contact with people.

“The best thing about being a doctor is that every patient is different. They are different in their being, their race, and socio-economic level, and I get to know them all,” Jackelin says.

To make her dream come true, Jackelin keeps a busy schedule. From Monday to Friday she has hands-on training in the mornings in the hospital, lecture at university in the afternoons, and on Saturdays, she works for a medical brigade.

What she learns from university in the morning, she uses at the hospital in the afternoon. At the hospital, she works directly with patients under professional supervision of experienced doctors. Through her studies, Jackelin understands better what problems patients have and also how to help them.

For Jackelin, the most important thing about being a doctor is maintaining well-grounded knowledge and confidence. Both confidence in herself, as well as gaining the confidence of her patients. “If a patient trusts you, it is easier to help them.” When asked about the easiest and most challenging part of her studies, she answers, “I am really good in emergencies and doing patient check-ins. I love to talk to patients. To listen to them and to laugh with them.” On the other hand work, with a microscope is the most challenging part of her studies, because she can find it boring to keep at it for hours at a time.

Finally, she works for a medical brigade. They visit rural areas or poor regions to offer medical services to people living far from access to medical care. Being able to help people in need who do not have access to medicine was part of what drove her to become a doctor, as Jackelin grew up in a small rural community with hardly any medical support at all.

In one visit to a rural area, the most emotional moment of her year took place. It was her turn to help in the pharmacy and give injections to patients, when suddenly an old man came in. He had a deformed leg and could hardly walk. Jackelin attended to him, analyzed his wound and helped him through his treatment. Throughout the process, she talked to him and explained everything that she was doing.

At the end, he took her hand and said “Thanks a lot. You treated me today, like no doctor has ever treated me. Normally poor people, like me, are not used to being treated well. Often, doctors do not talk to us or feel disgusted. I have faith that you will be a really good doctor.”

Carina Eckl   
Communication Officer


You may be only one person in the world, but you may be all the world to one child.
—Fr. William Wasson

 

 


 

How to Help

 

Receive Our Newsletter